How to Get the Most Out of a Training Session With Your Pomeranian

Being successful in training your Pomeranian depends on a number of factors. There are many things you can tweak in order to get the most out of a training session but even just doing basics correctly will ensure a high success rate.

Before you start training I feel it’s important to take a moment and discuss your frame of mind. If you’re just starting out for the first time you’re probably quite enthusiastic about it, and that’s good. If, however you don’t really feel like it then don’t even get started. It’s supposed to be an enjoyable experience for the both of you. If you’re not enjoying yourself, don’t do it.

You can teach them how to do lots of tricks in addition to knowing how to behave around you. Pomeranians are very smart but can be stubborn and independent-minded. If you want to make things easier simply follow some of these general rules:

Length of time reserved for training your Pomeranian

Training sessions should be a lot shorter than most people think. No more than 10 minutes should be reserved in one training session for several reasons. First of all the dog loses patience and attention the longer you go.

Second of all, if he maintains his attention to you he will become less and less motivated. After all, you can’t make him obey your commands if he’s not motivated to do so.

Finally, training sessions should be upbeat and positive and enjoyable. Don’t do a training session just because it’s the time to do so, but because you want to. If you’re not in the mood don’t even get started. On the other hand, it’s a good idea to keep training sessions at roughly the same time every day.

Why does your Pomeranian listen to you?

Ask yourself if you know why your dog listens to you. Why does he obey? What’s his motivation? His motivation is reward. Be it a treat, praise, attention or a toy to play with, his motivation is reward.

What does that mean? It means that the more complex a task is, the less likely he is to be motivated to do it. Think of it this way: which is more rewarding? Chasing the cat or returning to the owner?

This is a key aspect in dog training, understanding why your dog responds. Concordantly, punishment will not motivate your Pomeranian any further. There is a general misconception about what punishment really is, because people think yelling and chain jerking are not punishments.

The opposite of reward is not punishment; it is simply – no reward

Never ever punish your dog when you’re training. Don’t yell, hit or scare him in any way. Electric shocks and other dramatic measures are out of the question. You don’t have to punish bad behavior; you simply have to not reward it.

It’s easy, just ignore failures. Award good behavior, ignore bad behavior. Part of your dog’s motivation is his inherent desire to please you. So if he doesn’t get what he wants (treats, praise, attention) he is going to stop doing what he’s doing and start doing what you want him to be doing in order to please you and get his reward.

What is the best time for training your Pomeranian?

The absolutely best time for training is when your dog is naturally craving for your affection, or for food. Depending on your reward type you want him to desire that reward during training.

If you are using food treats, train right before it’s time for a meal. Likewise, if your reward of choice is praise then schedule training time when your dog is naturally trying to get your attention. This way you ensure maximum motivation.

Of course these are just the basics of successful dog training. Training your Pomeranian should be an enjoyable experience for the both of you and these tips will help you understand your dog and appreciate him better. Once you have this mapped out you can start tweaking and shaping each session even more.

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